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Tales of a Rookie Principal: When Graduation is Over

Sometime in the last week of school, one of the seniors jokingly asked me if I was ready to be done with the school year. For context, we happened to be standing next to the class of 2017's senior wall where paint had already been rubbed into the carpet, music was playing, and seniors were clearly DONE.

I imagine that from the outside, it could look like a pretty stressful time of the year for school administrators, probably because it is. At the end of the school year, a high school admin has a lot to be focused on: graduation, final exams, staffing for the next year, schedule for the next year, closing out things with current year students, staff, and families. At moments, more is added to the to-do list than is taken off of it.

Even with all of this going on though, my response to the senior was an honest and sincere one: no, I wasn't ready for the school year to be over. There's still more work to be done!

The saddest day for me is the day after all of the learners leave. The hallways are quiet, the grades are entered, and whether you were ready or not, closure has come to the school year. It is the end of all of the opportunities that were created, explored, and dreamed.

Until next year. When the happiest day is the day before all of the learners arrive. You can feel the beginning of all of the opportunities that will be had and the small hum of possibility that will greet each learner.

The hallways are quiet today, but we can't wait to see you next year. Whether it is in our halls or on social media as you walk the halls of your college or university, we can't wait for that possibility to turn into reality.



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